Why I Went With an Old School Watch

41-I2OpcrTL._AC_UL260_SR200,260_

I decided to get an old school automatic watch last Christmas. Actually, I asked for it for Christmas from my wife and it magically appeared under the tree. It is a Seiko 5 Automatic watch, the one pictured here, SNK793, and has a blue dial. It is a thing of beauty. I went with the Seiko 5 because it was recommended by HODINKEE whom I follow on Instagram, as a good watch under a couple hundred bucks. I am very happy with it, now. At first, it would stop working overnight sometimes even after I wore it all day and all night. I figured it was broken. So I sent an email to SEIKO to find out about getting it replaced. They told me to make sure it was completely wound (duh) and that that might help. Alas, it seems to have done the trick. After I sat shaking the watch for 15 minutes at a stretch a few times, it seemed to work fine after that. I really love it. I went old school because I used to have a Stauer Atomic Watch that kept perfect time, but I tired of getting new batteries every couple of years. It may not seem like a big deal to get a new battery every couple of years, but where I live, there are not any jewelers close by. It’s always a hassle and I don’t change batteries myself, so as not to lose the watertight (mostly) seal that my watches have. So anyway, I decided to chuck the atomic timekeeper aside and pursue the magic of automatic winding. The Seiko is not as accurate as the Stauer, but I don’t have to worry about ever changing the battery. I also like the fact that time is a bit of a looser concept now that my watch may be a couple minutes fast or slow from time to time. It helps me keep perspective on life. Also, it feels like I’m able to disconnect from the Internet if I want to and not have to look at my phone for the time from time to time. It’s strangely liberating, but mostly, it feels like a throwback. I feel complete with just a self-contained mechanism on my wrist that operates separately from the Internet of Things and the official atomic time clock in Denver, Colorado.

Advertisements